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August 2016

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Vaguely sinister garbage bins...

Apr. 25th, 2017 17:48
batwrangler: Just for me. (Default)
[personal profile] batwrangler
.... are proliferating on my back deck like some kind of improbable alien menace from a Dr. Who Christmas special.
al_zorra: (Default)
[personal profile] al_zorra
      . . . . Politico is running a fascinating, illuminating report about journalism and why it is the way it is.  Or another way to put it, this report informs us to why the journalists and talking heads called the latest US presidential so wrong. This applies at least as much in every other country that still has has any vestige of a history of free expression, free press and investigative journalism -- whether Britain, Japan, etc.  Read the Politico piece here.



The Media Bubble Is Worse Than You Think
We crunched the data on where journalists work and how fast it’s changing. The results should worry you.
By JACK SHAFER and TUCKER DOHERTY May/June 2017
 
 
 
I've pulled a pertinent sequence, which follows below.  However the report is much more detailed and long than that.  It has graphs and stats like crazy.

.... The newspaper industry has jettisoned hundreds of thousands of jobs, due to falling advertising revenues. Dailies have shrunk sections, pages and features; some have retreated from daily publication; hundreds have closed. Daily and weekly newspaper publishers employed about 455,000 reporters, clerks, salespeople, designers and the like in 1990, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By January 2017, that workforce had more than halved to 173,900. Those losses were felt in almost every region of the country.

 
As newspapers have dwindled, internet publishers have added employees at a bracing clip. According to BLS data, a startling boom in “internet publishing and broadcasting” jobs has taken place. Since January 2008, internet publishing has grown from 77,900 jobs to 206,700 in January 2017. In late 2015, during Barack Obama’s second term, these two trend lines—jobs in newspapers, and jobs in internet publishing—finally crossed. For the first time, the number of workers in internet publishing exceeded the number of their newspaper brethren. Internet publishers are now adding workers at nearly twice the rate newspaper publishers are losing them.

This isn’t just a shift in medium. It’s also a shift in sociopolitics, and a radical one. Where newspaper jobs are spread nationwide, internet jobs are not: Today, 73 percent of all internet publishing jobs are concentrated in either the Boston-New York-Washington-Richmond corridor or the West Coast crescent that runs from Seattle to San Diego and on to Phoenix. The Chicagoland area, a traditional media center, captures 5 percent of the jobs, with a paltry 22 percent going to the rest of the country. And almost all the real growth of internet publishing is happening outside the heartland, in just a few urban counties, all places that voted for Clinton. So when your conservative friends use “media” as a synonym for “coastal” and “liberal,” they’re not far off the mark.

What caused the majority of national media jobs to concentrate on the coasts? An alignment of the stars? A flocking of like-minded humans? The answer is far more structural, and far more difficult to alter: It was economics that done the deed.

The magic of the internet was going to shake up the old certainties of the job market, prevent the coagulation of jobs in the big metro areas, or so the Web utopians promised us in the mid-1990s. The technology would free internet employees to work from wherever they could find a broadband connection. That remains true in theory, with thousands of Web developers, writers and producers working remotely from lesser metropolises.

But economists know something the internet evangelists have ignored: All else being equal, specialized industries like to cluster. Car companies didn’t arise in remote regions that needed cars—they arose in Detroit, which already had heavy industry, was near natural resources, boasted a skilled workforce and was home to a network of suppliers that could help car companies thrive. As industries grow, they bud and create spinoffs, the best example being the way Silicon Valley blossomed from just a handful of pioneering electronics firms in the 1960s. Seattle’s rise as a tech powerhouse was seeded by Microsoft, which moved to the area in 1979 and helped create the ecosystem that gave rise to companies like Amazon.



 
 

Liberation

Apr. 25th, 2017 20:50
liv: In English: My fandom is text obsessed / In Hebrew: These are the words (words)
[personal profile] liv
I made the classic mistake with Passover this year, of getting worked up and stressed about the practicalities of it instead of preparing spiritually. Actually it all went completely fine, but it wasn't until the last day of the festival, when all the organization was over, that I actually remembered to feel joy and celebration for being free.

contains religion )

Monday was just wonderful, though. That was when it really started to sink in that not only was I actually happy at being redeemed from slavery, but I am incredibly joyful and grateful to have such an excellent family. Both the ones I grew up with who are so great to celebrate Pesach with, and my family of choice who are incredibly supportive about joining in with my festivals and including me in theirs in a really respectful and non-pressurey way. We played D&D with [personal profile] jack GMing, something we've been meaning to do for ages and just not had time for, and it was really fun and relaxing.

Tuesday Yardening

Apr. 25th, 2017 13:46
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
While cleaning house, Doug found some misplaced bulbs, so I went out and planted those.

Today is sunny, warm, and breezy. 

EDIT 4/25/17: Round 2, I planted a butterfly weed beside the barrel garden and prairie onion in the septic garden.  Then I watered plants.

Poetry Fishbowl on Tuesday, May 2

Apr. 25th, 2017 13:26
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This is an advance announcement for the Tuesday, May 2, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. This time the theme will be "history written by the losers." I'll be soliciting ideas for historians, other chroniclers, invaders, the oppressed, the misunderstood, ordinary people, outcasts, refugees, fish out of water, abuse survivors, the women that men don't see, QUILTBAG folks, people of color, people with detested superpowers, "evil" races, untouchables, burakumin, former or current criminals, foster children, others on the fringes of society, fighting a holding action, retreating, losing everything, looking in the window, taking people for granted, expecting the unexpected, surviving oppression, hiding, upstanding, speaking truth to power, facing your demons, punching up, protesting, storytelling, battlefields, reservations, cities, slums, classrooms, hideouts, alleys, subways and sewers, liminal zones, government buildings, libraries, oral tradition history, poorskills, unpaid labor, self-sacrifice, emotional labor, disruptions, linchpins and ripplepoints, time travel, the Underground Railroad, unusual vulnerabilities, history books written by the loserspainted hides, minority languages, subversive literacysubversive education, humility, humiliation, appreciation, social evolution, and poetic forms in particular.

I have a linkback poem, "Lead Us in Peace" (18 verses, Clay of Life). 

If you're interested, mark the date on your calendar, and please hold actual prompts until the "Poetry Fishbowl Open" post next week.  (If you're not available that day, or you live in a time zone that makes it hard to reach me, you can leave advance prompts.  I am now.)  Meanwhile, if you want to help with promotion, please feel free to link back here or repost this on your blog. 
 

New to the fishbowl?� Read all about it! )

 

So, farewell then...

Apr. 25th, 2017 19:05
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin

#mylivejournal #lj18 #happybirthday

Haven't yet actually deleted my lj - there are still - probably less than a handful? - people posting there whom I read who haven't made the switch to DW - though I rescinded auto-payments back when the server move happened.

What cheered me about this was when I tried whether it would work in DW and previewed the post the misspelling of 'received' that showed up at the LJ is 18 page had been corrected. I was going to say something about it, I R pedant, but it seems I don't need to.

It's been a long time and I've made many friends, I've done things I wouldn't have done if I hadn't been on LJ and made those friends, it's a pity it had to end like this, even if my life has been predominantly at Dreamwidth since 2009, which is, in fact, for somewhat longer.

swan_tower: (Default)
[personal profile] swan_tower

medium-sized version of the cover for WITHIN THE SANCTUARY OF WINGS

At long last, the series is complete.

This story has been living in my head for . . . about a decade, I think. I know I wrote the first third of A Natural History of Dragons in 2007 or thereabouts, before stalling out on the plot and setting it aside. I came back to it in late 2010, sold it in 2011, the first book came out in 2013, and now, my friends, the end of the story is in your hands. (Or will be, as soon as you run out and buy it.)

I’m going to be launching a new blog series, along the lines of John Scalzi’s THE BIG IDEA or Mary Robinette Kowal’s MY FAVORITE BIT, called SPARK OF LIFE: a place for authors to talk about those moments where the story seems to take on a life of its own, with a character doing something unexpected or the world unfolding a bit of depth you didn’t plan for. For me that mostly tends to happen in the depths of the tale, when I’ve built up enough momentum and detail for such things to spring forth. But in the case of this series, it happened less than a page in, because the spark of life?

That was Isabella.

Countless reviews have talked about how the narrator is one of the strongest features of the story. I’m here to tell you that, like Athena from the head of Zeus, she sprang out more or less fully-formed. The foreword got added a bit later, so it was in those opening paragraphs of Chapter One, where Isabella talks about finding a sparkling in the garden and it falling to dust in her hands, that she came to instant and vivid life. Part of the reason that initial crack stalled out in 2007 — or rather, the reason it got so far before stalling — was because I was having so much fun just following along in her wake, exploring her world and listening to her talk. The narrative voice has consistently been one of the greatest joys of writing this series. I have an upcoming article where I talk about how sad it is for me to be done with the story, because it feels like a good friend has moved away and I won’t get to see her regularly anymore. That’s how much she’s lived in my head, these past years.

Stay tuned on future Tuesdays for a glimpse at how other authors’ stories came to life. And stay tuned in upcoming days for some more behind-the-scenes stuff about my own characters!

***

In the meanwhile, the book is out, and so are the reviews. Here’s a spoiler-free one from BiblioSanctum, and two reviews on one page at Fantasy Literature; here is a SPOILER-TASTIC one at Tor.com. (Do NOT click unless you’ve read the book or are fine with having the big discovery of the entire series laid out in full. I’m serious.) (And while I’m at it, the same goes for that Gizmodo article that shows all the interior art for the book, because spoilers can come in visual form, too. Love ya, Gizmodo, but oof. Tor.com warned; you didn’t.)

Back in the land of no spoilers, you can read about my absolute favorite bit of Within the Sanctuary of Wings on Mary Robinette Kowal’s blog. It’s . . . a wee bit topical, these days. And I’m on the Functional Nerds podcast, talking about all kinds of things that aren’t this book, because they like to give authors a chance to branch out and natter on about roleplaying games and things like that.

And finally, I’m currently running a giveaway on Twitter. Name your favorite female scientist in any field (there, or in comments here), and get a chance to win a signed book of your choice from my stash of author copies. It’s already a stiff competition; we’ve had dozens of women named. (If you were wondering why my Twitter stream has turned into a sea of retweeted names, that’s why.) You have until tomorrow!

Originally published at Swan Tower. You can comment here or there.

Requiescat in Pace

Apr. 25th, 2017 09:08
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
It turns out that the political situation is making for mental constipation. Which calls for some mental coffee and banana. Soon.All NY Times obituaries.

(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 12:54
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

Time grows short . . .

Last week of the free books. And while you're at it, why not buy some?

http://bookviewcafe.com/bookstore/book/dominions/

Tuesday floral report

Apr. 25th, 2017 12:42
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

More patches of coltsfoot seen, daffodils and hyacinths outside of town now, willow twigs turning yellow and red osier turning redder.

Didn't hear wood frogs by the roadside where I heard them on the previous ride -- either too cold or too much traffic noise.

Air temperature broke 50 F and it wasn't raining yet. Got out on the bike and didn't die of hypothermia.

15.28 miles, 1:17:16

I HATE IT

Apr. 25th, 2017 09:03
oracne: turtle (Default)
[personal profile] oracne
I really, really hate the Marvel "Secret Empire" storyline is which Captain America is magically retconned to have always been Hydra (read: Nazi). I know why they did it - they think it's shocking and edgy and will make their penises larger. They figured, they've already killed Cap once, and taken away his super serum, so all that's left is making him the very thing he and his creator hated. There is a distinct lack of imagination happening.

Nope. Nope, nope, nope. Burn it down.

In contrast, I'm really enjoying a lot of the new comics that don't have anything to do with Nazi Bullshit. I will continue buying Black Panther and Ms. Marvel and Hellcat and Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, to name a few. But I will not buy Nazi comics, unless Nazis are getting punched. And stomped on until they are gelid. And set on fire. And eaten by angry jackals, and then pooped into a vat of acid.

Some say you can't complain if you haven't read the material. But I do what I want.

So very sleeeeeeeeepy

Apr. 25th, 2017 11:47
filkerdave: (travel2)
[personal profile] filkerdave

A weekend at FKO was just what I needed, but it doesn't work well with "having enough sleep"

(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 10:50
thesilentpoet: (Default)
[personal profile] thesilentpoet posting in [community profile] crowdfunding
Hello all!

Once upon a time, I was active in this community, and much more so on Dreamwidth. Then I took what ultimately became a years-long sabbatical, and these days, flitting on the edges.

One of my goals for 2017, is to write more, both professionally and personally. Long story short, back in November, the husband and I moved to Pittsburgh, and had to dip into our savings to pay for moving expenses. Money has since been weird.

To that end, I have started a Patreon as a way to supplement our income with my writing. Primarily, I am posting on my Urban Fantasy novel, and occasionally, poetry.

Http://Patreon.com/srmaclin

Pledges start at as little as $1/month. There's some nifty perks and stretch goals in place.

Plus! Let me know you linked from Dreamwidth, and there will be a welcome perk thrown in!

My official last LJ post*

Apr. 25th, 2017 08:44
telophase: (Default)
[personal profile] telophase




* until and unless something happens, of course.

(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 08:16
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley
Sometimes my bubble intersects with your bubble. Don't count on it.

Still waiting

Apr. 25th, 2017 08:01
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

Air temperature 34 F, scattered clouds, wind north about 10 mph for the newspaper walk. We await rain, with the foremost question being whether the world will warm up enough for a bike ride before gloom and doom gather.

miss_s_b: (Default)
[personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [site community profile] dw_community_promo
Then maybe you will like [community profile] weekly_food_challenge! It went away for a while but now it's back!

Every Wednesday a new theme is posted. It might be an ingredient or a cuisine or something else. You then post your recipes inspired by the theme. We welcome vegetarians and other people with restricted diets. Come and join us!

ETA: I should not have constructed the title like that. Now my brain won't stop replaying the Cheezy Peaz sketch from the Fast Show... -_-"

(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 10:50
rolliraserin: (Default)
[personal profile] rolliraserin posting in [community profile] addme
NAME: doris, rolli

AGE: 32

INTERESTS & HOBBIES: huge books, movies, tv shows fan - shadowhunters, outlander, merlin, sherlock, marvel, DC, anne of green gables, little women, etc traveling, cinema, photoshop, ...

LOOKING FOR: people from different countries, fans, as crazy as I am,

ANYTHING ELSE?:  proud tumblr user - rolliraserin - too ;) . still have a lj account too , import my stuff a week ago , but u can find me with the same username at lj too